wellbehavedwomen-dontmakehistory

ereditaa:

If you are vocal about the situation in Israel/Palestine and you participate in pro-Palestine rallies and are trying to be as educated as you can, I am also going to expect you to call out any instances of antisemitism that you see/hear of, regardless of where in the world they…

strength-to-be-gentle-and-kind
When you’re a trans woman you are made to walk this very fine line, where if you act feminine you are accused of being a parody and if you act masculine, it is seen as a sign of your true male identity. And if you act sweet and demure, you’re accused of reinforcing patriarchal ideas of female passivity, but if you stand up for your own rights and make your voice heard, then you are dismissed as wielding male privilege and entitlement. We trans women are made to teeter on this tightrope, not because we are transsexuals, but because we are women. This is the same double bind that forces teenage girls to negotiate their way between virgin and whore, that forces female politicians and business women to be aggressive without being seen as a bitch, and to be feminine enough not to emasculate their alpha male colleagues, without being so girly as to undermine their own authority.
Julia Serano, Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive, p 28-9 (via bisexual-books)
misandry-mermaid

Twelve Steps to Creating a Rape Culture

  • Step 1: Tell girls they exist solely for male pleasure.
  • Step 2: Tell boys that the more sex they have and girls they exploit, the more masculine they are.
  • Step 3: Tell girls they can't actually have sex before marriage or they are unpure, unloveable, and equatable to a chewed-up wad of gum.
  • Step 4: Tell boys that they cannot control or make choices about their own sexual urges.
  • Step 5: Never mention or give accurate information about consent.
  • Step 6: Never mention or give accurate information about contraception.
  • Step 7: Call sexually active girls "sluts".
  • Step 8: Call sexually active boys "players".
  • Step 9: Blame girls for getting pregnant or infected with an STI.
  • Step 10: Blame girls when they get raped.
  • Step 11: Remind boys that they aren't fully responsible for their actions.
  • Step 12: Deny rape culture exists.
susiethemoderator

Broaching the topic of “White Privilege” is not synonymous with “All white people are evil and, I hate them all.” Chill out.

Want to watch a white person rush away from a dinner party? Just bust out phrases like “institutionalized racism,” “white supremacy,” and the oldie but goodie “residual effects of slavery that are still with us today,” and watch a room of white people clear itself out, or, at least, have them stammer out the names of all the black people they are friends with, and then offer another unsolicited list off all the good they’ve done for people of color.

When I talk about systemic racism and historical racial inequalities as it ties into white privilege and modern-day racism, I think I must sound like this to white people: “Hey Whitey! I am going to kill you.” I know this is a lot to ask of white people, but could you please STOP FLIPPING OUT when the topic of white privilege comes up? I’m talking about being defensive, blabbing about how there is no such thing as race (just one human race, which is actually made up of different races), and how you are so gifted as a white person that you “don’t see race.” Ooh, that last one, ouch.

That’s why we need to have this conversation — because the inability to “see” racism and privilege is exactly what white privilege is. Talking about race is not a trap. It’s not a game of “Gotcha with your Klan Hood Down.” Talking about white privilege is not about asking white people to leave their race. Nor is it about declaring genocide on the white race. (Besides, looks like we’re already going to outnumber you by 2050, so you might as well sit back, relax and enjoy being Wong-splained.)

Talking about white privilege is not even about trying to make you feel like shit for being white. Surprising, I know. But the conversation on white privilege concerns you and yet is not about YOU. And when you make it about how you feel personally attacked, we really don’t progress further into talking about how we’re going to fix racism. Really.

If you are a white person who gets nervous when white privilege gets brought up, imagine having to navigating racism in every day life as a person of color who must live with it. Imagine systemically being locked out of better education or healthcare, job opportunities or the mainstream American narrative.

There are moments as an Asian American when I’ve been regarded as an “honorary white.” (There are also many other moments when I am reminded that I will always be a perpetual foreigner despite the fact that my family has been in the United States for three generations.) But rather than take whatever privilege I can and run with it, I’m interested in talking with people who benefit from white privilege -– how and if they can recognize it and use their positions of privilege to dismantle the systems that oppress other people.

Believe it or not, I’d love for the world to be more equitable for EVERYONE. And when I ask you to recognize your white privilege, it’s not because I’m trying to place blame. It’s about asking white people to consider the moments where they are able to “pass” in certain situations. Where they are afforded privileges that they never earned. It’s about finding ways to cede privilege, space, and comfort to allow others to live in a more equitable world.

So white people, the conversation about race can’t happen without you. We can’t get things better if we aren’t all talking. If racism were an easy problem to fix, we would have fixed it already. Ending racism starts with recognizing privilege, systemic control over society at large, and when you are dismissing issues of racism then you have the privilege of being oblivious to.

Don’t get me wrong there are people of color who proclaim to drink the tears of white people. There are anti-racism activists who will never organize with the most “down” of white people. I don’t want to drink your white tears, but I’d be lying if I said that I don’t enjoy watching you squirm a little.

Come on, you got to give me that.
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jokesonyou
Because we don’t speak about sex, there is no socially acceptable language surrounding it. So the language of porn has jumped in to fill that space, and that’s an issue, because in a male-dominated industry the language of porn is all too often male-generated. The person who coined the term “finger blasting” didn’t have a vagina. The person who coined the term, “getting your ass railed” never got their ass railed. Pounding, hammering, banging… And language matters, because when the only language you have available is abusive and one-directional, in terms of having things done to you, it creates a very weird view of how sex works.

Porn Is Dead, Long Live Sex | VICE United States (via sinshine)

"beat the pussy up"

"tear that ass up"

"smashed that shit"

Porn has created a fucked up mindset and you cannot tell me it hasn’t

It’s not okay when you see nothing but

"MONSTER DICK DESTROYS TEEN PUSSY"

"SLUTS POUNDED FOR HOURS"

There is no intimacy. There is no sensitivity

Just the vagina as a masturbation toy for the penis to use.

Not two or more human beings coming together and actually ENJOYING themselves.

(via sourcedumal)

very important

(via augustic)